Hardheaded, and proud!

Hardheaded, and proud!

Yes. All my childhood I was called “hardheaded”. I was criticized for disobeing. Today, at 37, is for me a compliment when I am told that I am stubborn. With the little wisdom I have gained through the years, I learned to choose my battles.

There are all sorts of names for stubbornness. We talk about resilience, strength of character, some are also used to call it “having bad character”! I would like to explore with you how stubbornness can help you advance your career, slow you down, and how to take advantage of it during a job search process.

The sales points!

Have you ever received a job offer, in sales, because you were making great follow-ups? Demonstrating stubbornness as a form of persistence is in itself a good thing. Employers like people who do not give up.

No matter the job or career you pursue people who don’t quit, who demonstrate stubbornness, resilience are always getting new opportunities easily.

Developping resilience and stubbornness.

Much easier said than done. The first question I want to ask you is “How bad do you want this?” Until when are you going to keep trying? If your answer is “until…” you’re on the right track.

Do you remember when you were a child…

NO was not a valid answer. Abandonment is a learned response from our parents. It’s that simple. Today, asking for something more than 2 times is almost an insult. Statistics say that 80% of transactions, sales occur after the 5th to the 12th touch.

If you are a parent, I’m sure it takes more than 2 times before saying yes to your kids. I like people who are stubborn and I encourage my nephew and my niece not to abandon their plans and dreams at the first hurdle, nor the second, nor the third.

The flip side…

What I have learned over the years is to choose my battles. If I withdraw from a project is simply to come back in a different way. Persist, but know when to come back to the load. Take a step back, to return to the front then is not a failure. The only cause of the failure is abandoned.

In closing…

One year ago, I met Olivier Primeau, the popular owner of the BeachClub, there is a phrase in our meeting that really marked me, “For every big success that you see, never forget are at least nine failures you never hear about.” What would have happened after he had abandoned at the first obstacle?
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Voir les options de partage
Cacher les options de partage